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How To Check If You’ve Been Hacked Within Seconds

Even if your password is a bit more complicated that “qwerty,” your information is always out there in the big, bad world of the Internet. Just this week, it was revealed that hundreds of millions of account details had been stolen from many popular email services and websites.

By Anthony Von Dari@VOP Today


So, if you’re worried or curious that your account could be compromised, head over to haveibeenpwned.com.

Simply by tapping in your email address or username, you’ll instantly be able to find out whether any information from your account has been leaked.

If there is “no pwnage found” on your accounts, it’s still not a bad idea to change your password regularly.

Click HERE


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What Your Emojis Say About You

When you add a smiley face to the end of a message, you may be saying more than you realise. Emoticons, faces formed from punctuation symbols such as :-), and emojis, picture symbols such as :-(, are now common features of the way we communicate using phone and internet messaging services and social media.

BY NERTI U. QATJA@VOP_TODAY – Source: The Conversation

They can help your recipient understand a potentially ambiguous message, reinforce the emotion in what you’re saying, or communicate your feelings rapidly with a single character. But not everyone uses them – or interprets them – in the same way.

So we set out to discover how the use of these symbols influences the way others perceive us. Do different types of people use emoticons for a particular purpose, such as managing their image, for example? If so, what psychological factors are associated with these actions? To do this, we asked a group of students to complete questionnaires about themselves and then allow us to study their textual communication in a staged conversation.
The questions covered the students’ views on their personalities, self-esteem, social anxiety and self-presentation concerns (how worried they were about how other people perceived them). We also asked about the amount of emoticons they used and why they used them for text messages, emails and Facebook. We then took screenshots of their Facebook profiles and recorded a 10-minute conversation they had with another, unknown student via Facebook messenger.
We found that those people who rated themselves as agreeable (pleasant, likeable) were more likely to use emoticons on social media sites. We also found that those who were less worried about how other people perceived them were more likely to use sad emoticons.

Mirror to the real world

It seems that different people use emoticons differently depending on their personalities. People who are agreeable tend to use social and emotional cues in the real world to communicate that to other people, such as smiling and being encouraging. And to some degree that is mirrored in the virtual world through the use of smiling emoticons.

This is particularly the case on social networking sites such as Facebook, where messages may have bigger, wider audiences and where the interactions are richer and more complex than simple, one-to-one plain text messages. We can speculate that people who see themselves as more agreeable are stimulated in these virtual environments and make more of an attempt to convey that part of their personality through emoticons.

At the same time, if you’re less bothered about how people perceive you, you may be more comfortable displaying all your emotions, including sadness. And so a sad face on a message may be an indication that you’re more concerned with expressing yourself than with how others may judge you.

Some of our other findings also show how we’re more likely to use emoticons in some kinds of virtual communication than others. Perhaps understandably, our participants deemed emoticons inappropriate for more professional contexts, which probably explains why they said they used emoticons less in email than in text messages or social media.

Regardless of this, our participants reported that emoticons were a useful way of expressing themselves and reducing the ambiguity of messages. This suggests emoticons may be particularly important for individuals who find it difficult to express or interpret emotion or social intent using just text and the cues it can provide.

This has prompted us to start planning further research into whether emoticons could be beneficial for those on the autism spectrum. These individuals can struggle with social interaction and picking up emotional cues, so the clarity that emoticons bring to potentially ambiguous messages may help them to communicate.

Judging emoticons

For the final part of our research, we asked another group of people to look at the conversations and profiles we had recorded, in order to study how other people judge us based on our use of emoticons. We found that the more smiley emoticons a person had used, the more they were seen as agreeable, conscientious and open to new experiences.

But this didn’t always correspond to how people saw themselves. The emoticon users and those being asked to judge them were most likely to agree on how extroverted and open to new experiences they were. This suggests that while smiling emoticons may make people seem more agreeable and conscientious, that may not match up with their own real-world personalities.

All of this hints at how much the way we use emoticons and emojis appears to shape other people’s impressions of us – and the fact that we should be aware of how we use them online. Although we recorded examples of observers making positive judgements about other people’s emoticon usage, other behaviour could lead to less favourable impressions.

ISIS Twitter Accounts Linked To Saudi And British Governments

Hacktivists waging a cyber war on social media against ISIS. claim their efforts are being hampered by the authorities because the British government and her ally Saudi Arabia are the ones responsible for the spread of ISIS propaganda on Twitter.

By Nerti U. Qatja@VOP_Today – Source: Russia Insider


ISIS Twitter Accounts Traced to British Government

Twitter has blocked users accused of ‘harassing’ accounts linked to ISIS. Meanwhile, hackers have revealed that Twitter handles used by ISIS can be traced back to Saudi Arabia — and the British government. Surprise?

One of the central arguments used by governments looking to restrict internet freedoms and justify total surveillance is that social media and various other internet platforms allow “terrorists” to spread propaganda and incite violence. And of course, the only way to stop this horrible phenomenon — according to conventional wisdom — is to closely regulate speech on the internet, as well as adopt sweeping surveillance policies. Or at least so we’re told.

Which is why many were bewildered by Twitter’s decision to block “hacktivists” accused of “harassing” accounts linked to ISIS and other terrorist groups. The move made headlines earlier this month:

As quickly as ISIS sets up accounts and spreads propaganda, hackers from groups like Anonymous and Ctrl Sec are taking them down in their own online campaign #OpISIS.

The group updates followers, linking to the accounts they have spotted, while calling on other to join them and report Jihadi profiles.

But they have said the social media site is shutting them down.

In its own defense, Twitter has boasted that no less than 125,000 accounts linked to terrorist organizations have been removed. But internet activists say that Twitter has done little aside from acting on user-submitted complaints:

A statement from WauchulaGhost, an anti-terrorist hacker with the hacker collective Anonymous, said: “Who suspended 125,000 accounts? Anonymous, Anonymous affiliated groups, and everyday citizens.

“You do realise if we all stopped reporting terrorist accounts and graphic images, Twitter would be flooded with terrorists.”

After the announcement by Twitter angered Anonymous members revealed they have had their accounts banned – not ISIS.

In one day in February 15 hackers had their accounts shut down on Twitter, despite months of finding and reporting jihadis.

Why would Twitter ban users reporting accounts linked to ISIS? Maybe because some of these accounts can be traced back to Saudi Arabia, and even the British government. As it was reported in December:

Hackers have claimed that a number of Islamic State supporters’ social media accounts are being run from internet addresses linked to the [UK] Department of Work and Pensions.

A group of four young computer experts who call themselves VandaSec haveunearthed evidence indicating that at least three ISIS-supporting accounts can be traced back to the DWP.

But the story gets weirder.

The British government allegedly sold a larger amount of IP addresses to “two Saudi firms“, which explains why ISIS uses IP addresses that can be traced back to the British government. Sounds legit:

[T]he British government sold on a large number of IP addresses to two Saudi Arabian firms.

After the sale completed in October of this year, they were used by extremists to spread their message of hate.

Jamie Turner, an expert from a firm called PCA Predict, discovered a record of the sale of IP addresses, and found a large number were transferred to Saudi Arabia in October of this year.

He told us it was likely the IP addresses could still be traced back to the DWP because records of the addresses had not yet been fully updated.

The Cabinet Office has now admitted to selling the IP addresses on to Saudi Telecom and the Saudi-based Mobile Telecommunications Company earlier this year as part of a wider drive to get rid of a large number of the DWP’s IP addresses.

So Saudi firms are using IP addresses purchased from the British government to spread ISIS propaganda on Twitter. Meanwhile, activists who try to get these accounts removed are themselves banned. To top it all off, David Cameron is now boasting of all the “brilliant” UK arms exports to Saudi Arabia. We’re sure the Saudis will use those British weapons and British IP addresses for the greater good.

Any questions?

This Photo of HARRISON FORD Is GOING VIRAL ON TWITTER. Just One Problem…

A photo of actor and outspoken Democrat Harrison Ford holding a Donald Trump sign made its way around the internet Tuesday, just in time for the primaries:

By Nerti U. Qatja@VOP_Today – Source Daily Presser


And it’s safe to say that people freaked:

Some freaked out in excitement:

https://twitter.com/MarkCox79050557/status/709612429097828352?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

But after the post managed to circulate pretty much everywhere, this was revealed:

That’s right, the photo is fake.

Anonymous Accounts Are Being Shut Down by Twitter – For Fighting Against ISIS

Twitter shuts down Anonymous accounts ‘for harassing’ ISIS jihadis.

Anonymous Twitter accounts shut down

By Zoie O’BreinExpress


The social media site has come under fire from the hacktivists who recently told Express Online they are shutting down thousands of ISIS accounts every month.

While Twitter says it is making strong efforts to shut down terrorist accounts, said they do not see this happening, but they have been targeted themselves.

As quickly as ISIS sets up accounts and spreads propaganda, hackers from groups like Anonymous and Ctrl Sec are taking them down in their own online campaign #OpISIS.

The group updates followers, linking to the accounts they have spotted, while calling on other to join them and report Jihadi profiles.

But they have said the social media site is shutting them down.

Twitter has received severe criticism over its handling of the ISIS crisis in recent months.

ISIS accounts are being shut down by hackers

In January, a Florida woman, Tamara Fields, filed a lawsuit against the company, alleging that it breached the U.S. Anti-Terrorism Act by “spreading extremist propaganda,” which caused an attack in Jordan that killed her husband, a private contractor, Lloyd “Carl” Fields Jr.Twitter later published a blog post saying that since mid-2015 it suspended 125,000 accounts for “threatening or promoting terrorist acts, primarily related to ISIS.”

But this has been hotly disputed.

A statement from WauchulaGhost, an anti-terrorist hacker with the hacker collective Anonymous, said: “Who suspended 125,000 accounts? Anonymous, Anonymous affiliated groups, and everyday citizens.

“You do realise if we all stopped reporting terrorist accounts and graphic images, Twitter would be flooded with terrorists.”

After the announcement by Twitter angered Anonymous members revealed they have had their accounts banned – not ISIS.

In one day in February 15 hackers had their accounts shut down on Tiwtter, despite months of finding and reporting jihadis.

Their supporters complained to Twitter in their droves and their accounts were reactivated within two hours.

WauchulaGhost said in an interview with Epoch Times it is widely believed Twitter is shutting down the accounts because of ‘anti-bullying’ pledge.

He said: “I can say they are suspending a lot of accounts for harassment. Good accounts not Daesh accounts.

“Even a lot of our (Anonymous) accounts are being suspended for harassment.”

The hacker also said that if Twitter is committed to stopping terrorism they should add a ‘terrorism’ button to the reporting options.

There are about 2,000 ISIS-supporting Twitter accounts active each day, and Twitter and Facebook are the two main platforms used by ISIS supporters to spread their propaganda, according to a February report from George Washington University.

Jihadis often pose on Twitter

Of those 2,000 accounts, there are around 350 Twitter accounts that act as the main core for ISIS propaganda on Twitter—and these accounts are used to re-establish the followings of accounts each time one is banned.According to the George Washington University report, each time an ISIS account gets suspended, the user needs to create a new account, and over time these accounts have “suffered devastating reductions in their follower counts.”

A Twitter spokesman told the Epoch Times: “We have teams around the world actively investigating reports of rule violations, and they work with law enforcement entities when appropriate.”

Poisoned Mind: Social Media in the 21st Century

‘According to an article on the website of ‘Radio Free Europe’, a nondescript modern 4-storey building on Savushkina Street, St. Petersburg, houses the innocuously titled ‘Internet Research Centre’.

Social-Media-Facebook-Spying

Inside the building operate government controlled and tasked teams of professional ‘trolls’. Spread across approximately 40 rooms, the trolls prowl the Internet in 12 hour shifts, generating pro-Kremlin comments and ‘gaming’ Internet forums and online conversations.

St. Petersburg blogger Marat Burkhard recently came forward to describe the apparent covert activities in detail. Burkhard describes his co-workers as “politically illiterate young people” who must be briefed on current topics at the beginning of each shift and continually supervised.’

Read more: Poisoned Mind: Social Media in the 21st Century